txtlit.co.uk - The UK's Easiest to Enter Writing Competitions

Example Story
She denied stealing the shoes, though witnesses had seen her attempt to secrete the red, shiny stilettos. A victim of fashion, the evidence was patent.
 
April 2014 Competition

Your competition theme for April is 'America'. Whatever that inspires in you, write a story about it in 154 characters or less, precede it with the word STORY and a space and text it to 82085

May 2014 Competition

May's competition theme will be announced at the end of the April, so come back to find out what it will be and to see the results for March.  

 

 

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Competition Results

Results are published Below. Make sure you check back regularly to get the latest competiton news and themes.



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Remember, whilst the act of entring the competitions is easy, writing a compelling story in just 154 characters takes some doing, but it's excellent writing practice and makes for good disciplined writing.

All competitions cost £1 per entry plus the cost of a standard text message from your mobile phone service provider.



November Competition: Theme - The Sea Print E-mail

Winning Entry:

The distant storm still rumbles, but now the ocean is a black mirror reflecting the rising flare. On the horizon, a floating shadow, and with it hope.



Congratulations to Rob Martin for winning the November's Txtlit compeition for which the theme was 'The Sea'. Rob MartinForty year old Rob lives in Plymouth with his wife, son and step daughter and works in the artwork department for a local printing company. He has written for pleasure on and off for ten years, but is now working on a children's novel for which he has received some very encouraging feedback from a writing tutor. Rob admits to being a terrible procrastinator so is hoping for the motivation to get his novel finished. He loves reading and makes sure that every novel he reads is a different genre to the previous one. He lists The Great Gatsby, The Day of the Triffids and Cloud Atlas amongst his favourite titles. He goes on to tell us that when he makes his fortune he wants to build a castle on an island.

 

We had a very high standard of entry for the November competition and there were some very good entries that tried to stretch what was a fairly prescriptive theme. The winning entry from Rob Martin was a clear winner. This story is not just a perfect example of how to write a Txtlit story but is a lesson in writing for any writer. Look at how much we are told in just 150 characters. We have just experienced a storm that continues in the distance. We are in or near darkness and have just sent up a distress flare. Clearly we are adrift, probably in a life raft having lost our vessel to the storm. Distraught, we see the silhouette of a ship on the horizon that we hope will save us. Add to this detail an excellent story construction, clever use of language and a perfect tempo. Well done Rob, we absolutely loved this one!


Other Shortlisted Entries:


Awestruck the tribe gazed at the endless sea which had swallowed their hunting grounds now they were trapped by what would one day be the English channel.

By La-Verne Hamil from Sussex  


The ship had gone down some ways back. The sea had claimed my family; everything and everyone I love. I dove down and let the waters take me back to them.

By Daniel Fielding

 

Atrocious weather and that albatross they'd had for lunch was definitely off. As Jonah hung over the side puking, he felt the day couldn't get any worse.

By Barbara Hickson 


And we had to put this one in...

The Dead Sea Scrolls were found. Biblical manuscripts containing 972 texts. And yet still they never won first prize in a Txtlit competition.

By Carol Bennion-Pedley

 

 

 



 

 
October Competition: Theme - Glad to be Print E-mail

Winning Entry:

The cell doors are opened, I am shoved into my small, dark, comforting home. I have killed a man, but feel no remorse. I'm glad to be back.



Well done to Phoebe Thomson from London who wins our October competition which had the theme, Phoebe Thomson"Glad to Be". Phoebe is just 17 years old, which we think makes her the youngest winner of a Txtlit competition we've ever had. Phoebe is still at school and enjoys writing and reading and listening to the radio.  She hopes to study English and History at University, but is also studying Maths and Art at the moment. Phoebe also cites 'getting letters in the post' as one of the things she enjoys, so we expect she'll be ecstatic when she receives her winner's cheque.

 

Most of you did a good job of getting to grips with the theme for October, although as it was a little out of the ordinary, the number of entries we received was noticeably down on the monthly average. Paradoxically, this made judging all the more difficult, as the standard of entries was very high. We settled on this entry by Phoebe Thomson as the winner. It’s not an overly complicated story but the underlying message is very strong. It is well paced and builds nicely from the cell door opening and being shoved in. Our protagonist however, finds comfort in the smallness and darkness of what he refers to as home. We learn that he has killed someone; anyone, just a man, and is unremorseful. Note how well placed the final phrase is. This is clearly someone who is institutionalised to the point of insanity, where he is prepared to go as far as murder to put himself back into familiar surroundings where he finally feels safe. Powerful stuff and just 139 characters.


Other Shortlisted Entries:


Handcuffed, blindfolded and scared out of his mind, the British hostage begged for his life. Rory prayed and thanked God his Irish passport had saved him.

By Stephen Rooney   


I look in the rear-view mirror. Blue lights shine brighter. Sirens sound louder. Police edge closer. Officers pull me over. I'm so glad to be sober.

Also by Stephen Rooney  

 

She was glad to be back. It had only been a few  minutes but  long enough to see the light. This wasn't her time. Heaven can wait.

By Val Fish from Peterboroughn  


 

 

 



 

 
September Competition: Theme - Just One Chance Print E-mail

Winning Entry:

He reached out to her as he sprinted across the roof; felt her warm fingers brush past his, then the cool air as she fell backwards over the edge. Missed.



Well done Abla Seckley, winner of September's competition, the theme for which was "Just One Chance".Image 18 year old Abla is currently studying Law at the University of Kent.  She enjoys reading and writing short stories in her spare time and tells us her favorites are the ones with the unexpected plot twists and bitter sweet endings or victories.  This is the first competition that Abla has entered, so with such success she'll doubtless be entering some more.

 

Our September theme of "Just One Chance" produced an array of story ideas and plots from you all. That's a good indicator to us at Txtlit.co.uk that we've once again set a good theme that can be interpreted in many different ways. The winning entry from Abla Seckley is one of those Txtlit stories that you don't fully get first time and takes one or more re-reads to fully understand. The advantage of a micro story is that it is re-readable in just a few seconds, so we don't see this as a bad thing when we are judging entries. It is only after one or two re-reads that we fully understand the situation and so why we enter the story witnessing someone sprinting across a roof. We love the contrast of the warm fingers and the cool air which superbly demonstrates the failure of our character as he has just one chance to fully grasp the hand of the girl or woman to prevent her from falling from the roof. We are not told in the story but Abla has cleverly made it seem as though the female character is taking her own life by deliberately falling. The final word 'missed' does demean the story a little and probably could have been omitted altogether as we are already aware of the failure, but otherwise this is a fine entry and a worthy winner.


Other Shortlisted Entries:


I wait. In moments he will be gone, lost in a sea of faces. The gun rests weightily in my hand, my fingers twitch, but I wait. Wait for the right moment.

By Fiona Points  


His palms were slick, his mouth dry. A puff on the inhaler to steady the nerves. "Okay", he said, rolling the conker between his fingers, "I'm ready".

By Amy Ekins 

And "Tut tut!" to this entry...

The tornado tore through the living room, splitting the Monopoly board neatly in two. Half of it just flew away. Now we only had one Chance.

By Clare Kirwan  


 

 

 



 

 
August 2012 Competition: Theme - Together Print E-mail

Winning Entry:

Tears. Red faced and screaming. She gives a final push and he's gone. And in that parting, lifted swiftly to breast, they come together. Mother and son.



Congratulations to Richard Brenton from Dobwalls in Cornwall who wins August's competitionRichard Brenton themed 'Together'. Having enjoyed writing fiction since he was very young Richard has recently completed a course in creative fiction through his local adult education center which gave him the confidence to start entering competitions. He has completed three novels and is now confident enough to start sending his novel 'Necklace' out to agents. It's a novel about second chances in which ghosts, goddesses, and witches give a wheelchair bound woman and the boy responsible for her injuries a second chance to make the correct decisions. Richard has two young children, who, he says can make finding the time to write tricky. He admits that without the support of his wife, finding time to write would be next to impossible, especially as he suffers from a chronic and painful spinal disease. This is Richard's second attempt at a Txtlit compeition after discovering our website through an article in Writing Magazine.

 

The diversity of story ideas in the entries that we receive for any particular monthly competition is always a good indicator that we have set a good theme that sets your grey matter whirring. We clearly did a good job for August because we had a whole raft of different ideas and concepts. This entry from Richard Brenton isn't the best micro story, technically, that we've received but we chose it as the winner because we loved the idea and how it was applied. We think the opening could have been written to lead us astray a little more, although it's clear that we are thrown into a situation of trauma and anxiety with tears and screaming. For a story that is supposed to be about together, we are confused by why our protaganist is giving a final push to apparently rid herself of someone, but all becomes clear as the revelation that this is a scene of childbirth is made apparent, giving us a subtle twist. It's certainly a different take on giving birth, and here at Txtlit we found the story and the idea of pushing something or somebody away in order to be together very thought provoking.


Other Shortlisted Entries:


The separation was smooth enough. Through a gas haze I heard the doctor's voice "Better apart." Maybe - I mused; fading - but only for the twin who lives.

By Sian Altman 


Two and a half with twist and a rip entry. Execution and synchronization almost flawless - the final score confirms it. They hug, faces glistening. GOLD!

By Doreen Doherty 

And we thougt this was neat.
 

Two legs lashed. Three legs dashed. Together we won the race.

By Martin haden  


 

 

 



 

 
July 2012 Competition: Theme - Trouble Print E-mail

Winning Entry:

Skidding to a halt one step too late he grappled. China leapt from his grasp, like the elusive bath soap. There it lay, a porcelain jigsaw on the floor.



Well done Hannah Barratt from Cambridgeshire who wins our July competition themed 'Trouble'. Hannah BarrattHaving three small children, she probably has enough trouble of her own. Hannah loves her part time job as a cardiac nurse where she tells us she gets to meet the most amazing characters.  She has always loved writing but has only recently started thinking about doing something more with it. With her youngest child approaching four she finally gets the odd moment when her brain is not completely addled and she can focus her thoughts on writing. Sounds like Txtlit is a perfect solution for Hannah.

 

The summer months are traditionally quieter for competition entries, presumably because people are on holiday and out of the country, but a lower than usual entry rate didn't affect the quality of the stories we received for July's competition. For our 'Trouble' themed competition, this entry from Hannah Barratt was the eventual winner because we loved the imagery that was built around an almost classic scenario. The fact that our protagonist has skidded to a halt tells us he was travelling too fast. The simile of the elusive bath soap allows us to clearly visualise our character fumbling with what we assume to be a vase, knocked from a stand or a shelf above a polished wooden floor. No twists or turns in this story but the lovely description of the 'porcelain jigsaw' to describe the broken vase tells us exactly what has happened and again adds to the visualisation. Although the theme isn't directly referred to we can almost hear the words."I'm in trouble".


Other Shortlisted Entries:


"Tell him nobody's leaving. I've changed my mind. If nine plagues couldn't break me, nothing can," said Pharaoh, patting the head of his eldest son.

By Doreen Doherty 


I wait in the dark. Each minute passes with slow deliberation. I watch her leave her house. I follow. Once chosen, she never had a chance.

By Richard Brenton 


Thrown from the vessel by the wave, Jan knew that she had scant moments to tell her spouse of 37 years how she felt. Texting frantically, she sent "IH8U."

By Clive Owen from Leeds 


 

 

 



 

 
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